• Middle Ear Fluid and Your Child

    The middle ear is the space behind the eardrum that is usually filled with air. When a child has middle ear fluid (otitis media with effusion), it means that a watery or mucus-like fluid has collected in the middle ear. Otitis media means middle ear inflammation, and effusion means fluid.

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  • Parenting Your Infant
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  • Yeast Diaper Rash (Candidiasis)

    A shiny red rash, pinker than usual skin, or red bumps in the diaper area that may be caused by a yeast called Candida. There are other causes of diaper rash that produce a similar skin appearance but are not caused by an infection.

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  • Newborn Hearing Screening and Your Baby

    Before you bring your newborn home from the hospital, your baby needs to have a hearing screening.

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  • Premature Newborns (Preemies): An Overview

    One in 10 babies (9.6%) was born prematurely in the United States in 2016.

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  • Lead Is a Poison: What You Need to Know

    Lead in the body can affect child development and behavior. Lead is a metal that is found in a lot of places. Though you can't usually see it, there are things you can do to prevent your child from being exposed to lead. No safe level of lead has been identified for children. Children are at highest

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  • Is Your Toddler Communicating With You?

    Your baby is able to communicate with you long before he or she speaks a single word! A baby's cry, smile, and responses to you help you to understand his or her needs. In this publication the American Academy of Pediatrics shares information about how children communicate and what to do when there are

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  • Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease is an important public health problem in some areas of the United States. Since its discovery in Lyme, CT, in 1975, thousands of cases of the disease have been reported across the United States and around the world. By knowing more about the disease and how to prevent it, you can help keep

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  • Jaundice and Your Newborn

    Congratulations on the birth of your new baby!

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  • Inhaled and Intranasal Corticosteroids and Your Child

    If your child has asthma or allergic rhinitis (hay fever), your pediatrician may prescribe a corticosteroid, also commonly referred to as a steroid. These medicines are the best available to decrease the swelling and irritation (inflammation) that occurs with persistent asthma or allergy. They are not

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  • Home Safety Checklist

    Is your house a safe place for your child to live and play? The following safety checklist can help you prevent serious injuries or even death. Though it addresses common safety concerns, it's important to remember that every house is different and no checklist is complete. Because there may be other

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  • How to Take Your Child's Temperature

    Your temperature (TEM-pruh-chur) is how warm or cold your body is. Normal temperature for a child is 98°F to 99°F or 37°C. The small circle (°) means “degrees.” Anything over 100.4°F or 38°C is a fever. (See “Words to Know” for “F” and “C.”)

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  • Immunizations: What You Need To Know

    Immunizations have helped children stay healthy for more than 50 years. They are safe and they work. In fact, serious side effects are no more common than those from other types of medication. Vaccinations have reduced the number of infections from vaccine-preventable diseases by more than 90%! Yet many

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  • How to Prevent Tooth Decay in Your Baby

    Baby teeth are important. If baby teeth are lost too early, the teeth that are left may move and not leave any room for adult teeth to come in. Also, if tooth decay is not prevented, it can be costly to treat, cause pain, and lead to life-threatening infections.

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  • Hepatitis C

    About 4 million Americans are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV), and many do not even know it. Anyone can get infected with HCV, including children.

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  • Imaging Tests: A Look Inside Your Child's Body

    If your pediatrician isn't sure what the cause of your child's illness or injury is, imaging tests may be needed. Imaging tests are used to “look” inside the body. They can help diagnose injuries and illnesses from broken bones to cancer. Some tests can even find problems before symptoms appear.

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Contact Us

Location & Hours

Our Location

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Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Our Pediatric Office

Monday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Friday:

8:00 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

08:00 am - 12:00 pm - Only same-day, urgent, sick visits by appointment.*

Sunday:

Closed